Recent Reads 2

Reading Wrap-ups, Reviews

Before I took a break from blogging, I did monthly wrap-ups and they were really long and took ages to write and put together so I wanted to try something different. I want to put out mini-reviews every time I complete three books. I think this will be more manageable for me and more readable for you guys so let’s get started! Find my last “Recent Reads” here.

Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Power

Release Date: July 7, 2020

Genre: YA Horror

Pages: 352

Click here for trigger warnings.

Goodreads Synopsis

Ever since Margot was born, it’s been just her and her mother. No answers to Margot’s questions about what came before. No history to hold on to. No relative to speak of. Just the two of them, stuck in their run-down apartment, struggling to get along.

But that’s not enough for Margot. She wants family. She wants a past. And she just found the key she needs to get it: A photograph, pointing her to a town called Phalene. Pointing her home. Only, when Margot gets there, it’s not what she bargained for.

Margot’s mother left for a reason. But was it to hide her past? Or was it to protect Margot from what’s still there?

The only thing Margot knows for sure is there’s poison in their family tree, and their roots are dug so deeply into Phalene that now that she’s there, she might never escape. 

Brief Review

It’s been a little while since I finished this book but I still am not quite sure how I feel about it. I think it was incredibly atmospheric and I really liked Margot as a character. She wanted answers and something different from the life she had at home and there were many times growing up where I could relate. I also really liked Tess. She starts out pretty unlikable (or at least I was unsure about her) but I grew to love her more as the story progressed. The problem for me was that I felt that the first 75% of the book was really slow. I had some theories about the mystery that’s presented (I was wrong) and some of the early clues and reveals were exciting but overall, I just felt like it was so slow. I wanted something more but I can’t quite put my finger on it. The ending, on the other hand, was phenomenal. I really liked the direction the story took and I was satisfied with the ending. It was a wild time and I’ll never think about corn or apricots the same ever again.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

Release Date: October 12 2010

Genre: YA fantasy

Pages: 553

Click here for trigger warnings.

Goodreads Synopsis

JASON HAS A PROBLEM. He doesn’t remember anything before waking up in a bus full of kids on a field trip. Apparently he has a girlfriend named Piper, and his best friend is a guy named Leo. They’re all students at the Wilderness School, a boarding school for “bad kids,” as Leo puts it. What did Jason do to end up here? And where is here, exactly? Jason doesn’t know anything—except that everything seems very wrong.

PIPER HAS A SECRET. Her father has been missing for three days, ever since she had that terrifying nightmare about his being in trouble. Piper doesn’t understand her dream, or why her boyfriend suddenly doesn’t recognize her. When a freak storm hits during the school trip, unleashing strange creatures and whisking her, Jason, and Leo away to someplace called Camp Half-Blood, she has a feeling she’s going to find out, whether she wants to or not.

LEO HAS A WAY WITH TOOLS. When he sees his cabin at Camp Half-Blood, filled with power tools and machine parts, he feels right at home. But there’s weird stuff, too—like the curse everyone keeps talking about, and some camper who’s gone missing. Weirdest of all, his bunkmates insist that each of them—including Leo—is related to a god. Does this have anything to do with Jason’s amnesia, or the fact that Leo keeps seeing ghosts?

Join new and old friends from Camp Half-Blood in this thrilling first book in The Heroes of Olympus series. Best-selling author Rick Riordan has pumped up the action, humor, suspense, and mystery in an epic adventure that will leave readers panting for the next installment.

Brief Review

The first thing I noticed about this book was the length. It’s over 550 pages but I still flew through it and enjoyed every moment of it. This has the same amount of action and excitement mixed with comedic moments that made me laugh out loud that were in the original series. I also really loved the characters we meet in this series. I really connected to both Leo and Piper and was really rooting for them to accomplish their goals and be happy. The ending was also phenomenal! That realization! That cliffhanger! I was so hype after I finished and excited to see what happens next in the series. Let’s GOOOOO!!

The Removed by Brandon Hobson

Release Date: February 2, 2021

Genre: Adult Contemporary

Pages: 270

Click here for trigger warnings.

Goodreads Synopsis

Steeped in Cherokee myths and history, a novel about a fractured family reckoning with the tragic death of their son long ago—from National Book Award finalist Brandon Hobson

In the fifteen years since their teenage son, Ray-Ray, was killed in a police shooting, the Echota family has been suspended in private grief. The mother, Maria, increasingly struggles to manage the onset of Alzheimer’s in her husband, Ernest. Their adult daughter, Sonja, leads a life of solitude, punctuated only by spells of dizzying romantic obsession. And their son, Edgar, fled home long ago, turning to drugs to mute his feelings of alienation.

With the family’s annual bonfire approaching—an occasion marking both the Cherokee National Holiday and Ray-Ray’s death, and a rare moment in which they openly talk about his memory—Maria attempts to call the family together from their physical and emotional distances once more. But as the bonfire draws near, each of them feels a strange blurring of the boundary between normal life and the spirit world. Maria and Ernest take in a foster child who seems to almost miraculously keep Ernest’s mental fog at bay. Sonja becomes dangerously fixated on a man named Vin, despite—or perhaps because of—his ties to tragedy in her lifetime and lifetimes before. And in the wake of a suicide attempt, Edgar finds himself in the mysterious Darkening Land: a place between the living and the dead, where old atrocities echo.

Drawing deeply on Cherokee folklore, The Removed seamlessly blends the real and spiritual to excavate the deep reverberations of trauma—a meditation on family, grief, home, and the power of stories on both a personal and ancestral level.

Brief Review

This isn’t an easy read, not just because of the subject matter, but because the way the story is told isn’t a structure you might be used to if you tend to only read white, western authors. Though this book is only 270 pages, it takes time to process and think about. Without spoiling anything, there are chapters that do not take place in the real world. There are chapters told from the perspective of an ancestor of the family that don’t seem immediately connected to the main story but if you sit and think and maybe watch some interviews and do some outside research, the genius of this book starts to become more apparent. This story draws from Cherokee folklore as well as history. There are discussions about, not only the trauma that has impacted this family in their lifetimes but also intergenerational trauma. I am reminded of Toni Morrison’s Beloved when I think about this book. I really enjoyed it and if you’re in the mood for a book that forces you to take it slow and think, I’d suggest picking this up. Flying through it just because it’s short probably won’t give you the best experience and taking it slow is worth it. Please check out own voices reviewers for this book as I am not Indigenous and will certainly have missed some of the nuance and maybe even some important aspects of this story.

What have you been reading recently? Have you read any of these? Are you interested in any of them? Come chat with me!

Recent Reads

Reading Wrap-ups, Reviews

Before I took a break from blogging, I did monthly wrap-ups and they were really long and took ages to write and put together so I wanted to try something different. I want to put out mini-reviews every time I complete three books. I think this will be more manageable for me and more readable for you guys so welcome to my first three reads of the year!

The Road to Oz by L. Frank Baum

Release Date: 1909

Genre: Children’s fantasy

Pages: 261

Goodreads Synopsis

Meet Dorothy’s new friends, the Shaggy Man, Button Bright and Polychrome, as you travel with them to the Emerald City. Share their adventures with the Musicker and the Scoodlers. See how they escape from the Soup-Kettle and what they found at the Truth Pond. Find out how they are able to cross the Deadly Desert and finally get to the Emerald City of Oz.

Brief Review

As you might know, I’m trying to work through the fourteen books in the Oz series, and in 2021, I’ve committed to reading one each month until I’m done. The Road to Oz is the fifth book in the series. The beginning of The Road to Oz had me laughing out loud. The Shaggy Man and Button-Bright are new characters and their interactions are so funny. This one also gave me some insight into L. Frank Baum. I’m fascinated by him and what he was thinking about when he wrote these stories and in this particular entry, he includes a brief exchange between (I think) The Shaggy Man and the Tin Woodman where they talk about using money in exchange for goods. Oz, what I gather is supposed to be a perfect place in Baum’s eyes, doesn’t use money and the Tin Woodman finds the idea of money disgusting. I really thought this was interesting to include in the story. I do think the end was a little tedious but overall, still an interesting and fun story.

Grown by Tiffany D. Jackson

Release Date: September 15, 2020

Genre: YA contemporary, mystery

Pages: 384

Click here for trigger warnings.

Goodreads Synopsis

Korey Fields is dead.

When Enchanted Jones wakes with blood on her hands and zero memory of the previous night, no one—the police and Korey’s fans included—has more questions than she does. All she really knows is that this isn’t how things are supposed to be. Korey was Enchanted’s ticket to stardom.

Before there was a dead body, Enchanted was an aspiring singer, struggling with her tight knit family’s recent move to the suburbs while trying to find her place as the lone Black girl in high school. But then legendary R&B artist Korey Fields spots her at an audition. And suddenly her dream of being a professional singer takes flight.

Enchanted is dazzled by Korey’s luxurious life but soon her dream turns into a nightmare. Behind Korey’s charm and star power hides a dark side, one that wants to control her every move, with rage and consequences. Except now he’s dead and the police are at the door. Who killed Korey Fields?

All signs point to Enchanted.

Brief Thoughts

After reading Monday’s Not Coming last year, I’d been anticipating getting Grown from my library for months. As soon as I got it, I started reading it and before I knew it, I was halfway done. I took a break to eat dinner and then immediately went back to finish it. I don’t read books in one day but this one was so readable and I just had to know what was going to happen next. The pacing is phenomenal and keeps you turning the pages. This book, of course, deals with some difficult topics such as grooming, abuse, and stalking. It also has a lot to say about the way society doesn’t believe black women, especially in these situations. Enchanted is such an interesting and well-written character. She goes from wanting to live out her dreams to needing to protect herself and her family. The stakes are high the entire book and if you like hard-hitting contemporary, I recommend picking this up.

The Obelisk Gate by N. K. Jemisin

Release Date: August 16, 2016

Genre: Fantasy, Dystopia

Pages: 391

Click here for trigger warnings.

Goodreads Synopsis for the first book in the series (The Fifth Season)

This is the way the world ends. Again.

Three terrible things happen in a single day. Essun, a woman living an ordinary life in a small town, comes home to find that her husband has brutally murdered their son and kidnapped their daughter. Meanwhile, mighty Sanze — the world-spanning empire whose innovations have been civilization’s bedrock for a thousand years — collapses as most of its citizens are murdered to serve a madman’s vengeance. And worst of all, across the heart of the vast continent known as the Stillness, a great red rift has been torn into the heart of the earth, spewing ash enough to darken the sky for years. Or centuries.

Now Essun must pursue the wreckage of her family through a deadly, dying land. Without sunlight, clean water, or arable land, and with limited stockpiles of supplies, there will be war all across the Stillness: a battle royale of nations not for power or territory, but simply for the basic resources necessary to get through the long dark night. Essun does not care if the world falls apart around her. She’ll break it herself, if she must, to save her daughter.

Brief Thoughts

The first book in this series, The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin, was definitely at the top of my favorites list last year and I was so excited to pick up The Obelisk Gate. This is a fantastic sequel! It picks up immediately where the previous book left off and really allows readers to jump right back in and find out so much about this world and how the magic and orogeny works. I was also really excited to follow and character that I had so many questions about in the first book. I really appreciate Jemisin’s ability to casually reveal shocking information. The excitement every time I read something major sprinkled in a sentence was wonderful. I do think the middle portion of this book, in particular, is a bit slower than everything I’ve read in the series thus far but I think it was necessary in order to convey some complex information that was important to this story and that, I think, will be critical to the final installment. I can’t wait to read The Stone Sky next month and finish this wonderful series.

What have you been reading recently? Have you read any of these? Are you interested in any of them? Come chat with me!

Book Review – Trust Me – Nell Grey

Reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Release date: June 27, 2020

Genre: Romance, Mystery/Thriller

Pages: 266

Trigger warnings: suicide and abuse

Goodreads Synopsis

A powerful love story with a dark underbelly full of unexpected twists. Glyn Evans’ death is clearly a tragic suicide. An open and shut case. And yet something about it feels off…In a single day, Annie Evans’ life is blown to bits. It’s a huge mess and she desperately needs to escape from London. Her father’s died and she needs to go home. The place she’s been avoiding for years. Jac Jones is back home too. Annie’s vowed to ghost him. Whatever possessed her parents to let this ex special forces soldier rent their farm? Is he playing her again? For Sion Edwards, his old army buddy’s place is the perfect bolt hole. A safe place to hide from the people who want to make him pay for what he’s done. And they won’t rest until he’s dead. The detective is right. In this sleepy Welsh valley, not everything is as it seems…An addictive and compelling exploration of trust and betrayal.

Review

I was sent this book by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Annie is having issues with work and with romance when she learns of her father’s death. When she first returns to her childhood home, she is quick to accept the suicide ruling but is it that clear-cut? In addition to taking care of that, she discovers that someone she used to be romantically involved with is working on her family’s farm and she definitely doesn’t want to have anything to do with him.

I’ve never read a book that was both a romance and a mystery/thriller so I didn’t know what to expect. I typically read a lot of thrillers but I don’t read romance that often but this book definitely made me want more. We follow two story lines – one with Annie and Jac and another with one of Jac’s friends from the army. The whole time I wasn’t sure how the stories were going to come together and at a few points, I was nervous that it wouldn’t feel connected but I was definitely wrong. I had so much fun trying to figure out what these plots had to do with each other.

Something else I really enjoyed about this book was that it was clearly well-researched. This book takes place, in part, on a sheep farm and I didn’t really know what that entailed but seeing Annie and Jac get closer while having to do all of the work involved with the sheep was interesting to read about and made for a unique setting.

I will say that there was one place early on where I wasn’t sure if I was reading about the present or if it was a flashback but it was short and didn’t really hinder my overall enjoyment of the story.

The ending of Trust Me definitely gave me enough closure while still leaving things open enough for the sequel, Find Me. From what I understand, Find Me follows some of the side characters from Trust Me. I am excited to read and review the sequel in October!

Book Review – The Existence of Amy – Lana Grace Riva

Reviews

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Not the jokey kind of OCD where someone might occasionally double check they’ve locked the door and say ‘I’m so OCD about that door!’. There’s nothing remotely jokey about the kind I have.

Lana Grace Riva

Release date: August 2, 2019

Genre(s): Contemporary fiction

Pages: 283

Goodreads Synopsis

Amy has a normal life. That is, if you were to go by a definition of ‘no immediate obvious indicators of peculiarity’, and you didn’t know her very well. She has good friends, a good job, a nice enough home. This normality, however, is precariously plastered on top of a different life. A life that is Amy’s real life. The only one her brain will let her lead.

Review

I had the honor of being sent this book by the author in exchange for a review.

I want to stary this review by talking a little bit more about the plot of this book because the Goodreads synopsis doesn’t really do it justice. The Existence of Amy follows our title character through her everyday life – she rides the bus to and from her office job, talks to her work friends, navigates a life many of us might be totally familiar with. The only difference is that Amy struggles with OCD and depression which makes all of these things a little more complicated. When she is faced with the possibility of leaving the country for a work trip, Amy must decide how to handle this.

Lana Grace Riva gives readers a look at how simple tasks can be a bit more difficult for people who struggle with mental health issues. This character study even shows readers the conversations Amy is having with her own brain and I really appreciated that. I have anxiety and depression and felt that these conversations really captured the frustration I sometimes feel with myself because logically, I know my brain is sabotaging me but I don’t always know how to stop it. 

I also appreciated that Riva had the characters in this book talk about the importance of being able to talk about mental health professionals. It is good to open up to friends about your struggles if you can, but they can only do so much. Riva also makes readers aware that there is a certain privilege that allows people to be able to get adequate access to therapy. 

Something that didn’t really work for me with this book is that the first half felt a little slow compared to the second half. In showing what mundane tasks are like for Amy, the story itself became a little mundane. The second half really picks up, though, as Amy is forced to have to confront her struggles a little more head-on.

Overall, I think this book offers a view of what life with OCD and depression can be like for some people, and seeing Amy’s character growth was interesting to see. It gave me a lot to think about when it comes to the way I converse with my own mind.

Book Review – Home Before Dark – Riley Sager

Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Grief is tricky like that. It can lie low for hours, long enough for magical thinking to take hold. Then, when you’re good and vulnerable, it will leap out at you like a fun-house skeleton, and all the pain you thought was gone comes roaring back.

Riley Sager

Release Date: June 30, 2020

Genre(s): Thriller, Mystery

Publisher: Dutton Books

Goodreads Synopsis

What was it like? Living in that house.

Maggie Holt is used to such questions. Twenty-five years ago, she and her parents, Ewan and Jess, moved into Baneberry Hall, a rambling Victorian estate in the Vermont woods. They spent three weeks there before fleeing in the dead of night, an ordeal Ewan later recounted in a nonfiction book called House of Horrors. His tale of ghostly happenings and encounters with malevolent spirits became a worldwide phenomenon, rivaling The Amityville Horror in popularity—and skepticism.

Today, Maggie is a restorer of old homes and too young to remember any of the events mentioned in her father’s book. But she also doesn’t believe a word of it. Ghosts, after all, don’t exist. When Maggie inherits Baneberry Hall after her father’s death, she returns to renovate the place to prepare it for sale. But her homecoming is anything but warm. People from the past, chronicled in House of Horrors, lurk in the shadows. And locals aren’t thrilled that their small town has been made infamous thanks to Maggie’s father. Even more unnerving is Baneberry Hall itself—a place filled with relics from another era that hint at a history of dark deeds. As Maggie experiences strange occurrences straight out of her father’s book, she starts to believe that what he wrote was more fact than fiction.

In the latest thriller from New York Times bestseller Riley Sager, a woman returns to the house made famous by her father’s bestselling horror memoir. Is the place really haunted by evil forces, as her father claimed? Or are there more earthbound—and dangerous—secrets hidden within its walls?

Review

There weren’t any authors I’d auto-buy from until I read this book. I’ve now read three out of four of Riley Sager’s books (I haven’t got to The Last Time I Lied yet), and I can confidently say that I will pick up anything he writes now. I can’t get enough spooky twists and turns. Sager truly surprises me every single time. I wanted to squeeze this book into the last two days of June, and at first, I wasn’t sure that would be possible, but once I started reading this book, I didn’t want to put it down. I had to know what scary thing was going to happen next.

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book. It alternates between the present Maggie returning to her childhood home and chapters of the book her father wrote about their short time there. I’m a sucker for unusual narrative structures, and this book certainly delivers on that. The chapters from her father’s book vary in how reliable they are as the present-day plot continues, and you’re never sure what’s real and what isn’t until the end. It’s a thriller that I could definitely reread in light of the ending.

In addition to the chapters from the past not being reliable, our narrator isn’t reliable either. Maggie doesn’t remember anything from the twenty days she lived at Baneberry Hall, and it truly feels like you are piecing everything together with her. You never feel like she knows more than you, and that added so much to the excitement. 

Home Before Dark scared me in a way books never do, and as I’m writing this review, I keep hearing noises in my house and looking over my shoulder. It’s so creepy! I almost always get scared by movies but never from books; this really did it for me. Music from nowhere, eerie shadows, thudding noises all create an atmosphere that I felt like I was a part of the entire time. Not to mention that one scene with the snakes! I definitely recommend this book to people who like to be a little scared but maybe don’t pick it up right before bed 😉

Book Review – Ninth House – Leigh Bardugo

Reviews

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

I want to survive this world that keeps trying to destroy me.

Leigh Bardugo

Goodreads Synopsis

Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. By age twenty, in fact, she is the sole survivor of a horrific, unsolved multiple homicide. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most elite universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

Still searching for answers to this herself, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies. These eight windowless “tombs” are well-known to be haunts of the future rich and powerful, from high-ranking politicos to Wall Street and Hollywood’s biggest players. But their occult activities are revealed to be more sinister and more extraordinary than any paranoid imagination might conceive.

Review

I wanted to write this review earlier in the week, but I had a hard time figuring out how I feel about Ninth House. Before I get into this, I don’t read fantasy that often, and I’ve never read anything by Leigh Bardugo. I went in with hardly any expectations and honestly knew very little about the plot outside of “dark academia.”

The structure of this book was interesting. Chapters jump back and forth in time, and it is definitely one of those books where you have to keep reading to not be confused. I’m not really a fan of that type of narrative structure, but I usually follow along enough to figure it out, but this book felt overly confusing. I felt like I was always missing something.

That being said, I was always interested in where the story was going. I knew that some people were bored by the beginning of the book, but I didn’t see that. A lot was going on all the time. Ghosts, and rituals, and murder, oh my! In addition to the spooky and exciting plot points, many scenes need trigger warnings (listed at the end of this post). Some of it really added to the story, but others felt like they were superfluous. 

Thematically, Ninth House explores the way people in positions of power or people who are generally privileged exploit others for their own gain. Bardugo could have pushed it a little further and may do so in future books in this series. The social commentary in this book reminded me of the social commentary in Lock Every Door. I talk about this in my review, which you can read here.

I initially gave this book 4 stars on Goodreads, but I think I feel closer to 3.5 stars after reflecting on it more. If you’ve read this book, please come talk to me about it because my rating still doesn’t feel totally right. I’d like to hear what other people think, especially if they are Leigh Bardugo or fantasy fans.

TW for Ninth House: rape and sexual assault, murder, drug addiction, overdose, suicide, blackmail, self-harm

Book Review – Let’s Talk About Love – Claire Kann

Reviews

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Love was intangible. Universal. It was whatever someone wanted it to be and should be respected as such.

Claire Kann

Goodreads Synopsis

Alice had her whole summer planned. Non-stop all-you-can-eat buffets while marathoning her favorite TV shows (best friends totally included) with the smallest dash of adulting–working at the library to pay her share of the rent. The only thing missing from her perfect plan? Her girlfriend (who ended things when Alice confessed she’s asexual). Alice is done with dating–no thank you, do not pass go, stick a fork in her, done.

But then Alice meets Takumi and she can’t stop thinking about him or the rom com-grade romance feels she did not ask for (uncertainty, butterflies, and swoons, oh my!).

When her blissful summer takes an unexpected turn, and Takumi becomes her knight with a shiny library employee badge (close enough), Alice has to decide if she’s willing to risk their friendship for a love that might not be reciprocated—or understood.

Review

I’ve been having a hard time focusing on reading much of anything lately, so I gave myself the freedom to choose something that wasn’t on my TBR for this month. I wanted to read something fun and cute, and Let’s Talk About Love didn’t disappoint. I had such a fun time reading this rom-com and escaping from the world for a little bit.

What stood out most to me in this book was the characters. I thought Alice was code-orange cute! I was constantly rooting for her and her relationships with Takumi, her best friends, and her family. I was incredibly invested and HAD to know that everything was going to be okay for her. I also really liked Takumi. He is incredibly caring and thoughtful throughout the book.

I am neither black nor asexual, so I cannot speak for the accuracy of the representation, but it was refreshing to read a book that isn’t just your cookie-cutter white hetero romance. It is also important that Kann focuses on Alice’s friendships and her family dynamic as well. So many YA romances fall into the plot where the protagonist is all-consumed by their romantic relationships, and I don’t think it’s healthy for teens (or anyone really) to read or see that narrative over and over again. There are other things that are important in life contrary to what a ton of popular media primarily targeted to women would have you believe. This book can be important to pick up at any age, but I think it especially has a lot to offer for teens or young adults.

This book is not exclusively fluff and does bring up more serious topics. Not only is Alice discovering more about what being asexual and biromantic looks like for her, but she also mentions past microaggressions related to race. Seeing the intersectionality of being black and LGBTQIA+ is something else I think this book does well.

I bought this book on sale, and this Twitter thread will link you not only to places to purchase the book but also to a form to fill out when you do buy it so that Claire Kann can donate all royalties to National Bail Out. This is happening all month, so please check it out if you can!

Book Review – A Good Marriage – Kimberly McCreight

Reviews

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

I was always so willing to accept anything that might get us back to that perfect place where we’d begun.

A Good Marriage is a thriller which follows Lizzie after she gets a call from an old friend from law school who’s being held in Rikers because he assaulted a police officer. Oh, and his wife, Amanda, is dead. He wants Lizzie to help him clear his name but between Lizzie’s own personal troubles and the myriad of dramas unfolding in her investigation, it’s not going to be easy.

I was a little nervous going into this book because I knew there was definitely a legal thriller element to it and that’s not always my thing. McCreight certainly balances that out with tons of domestic drama. I had a really good time reading this book. I flew through it in just a few days because I wasn’t sure how all the threads were going to tie together and I simply needed to see where McCreight was going. For the most part, I wasn’t disappointed.

This story takes place primarily in Park Slope, a wealthy neighborhood in Brooklyn which is described well enough that you can imagine what it’s like even if you don’t know anything about it. It’s a cast of rich parents worried about their kids and their privacy but also like to have a bit of fun.

We switch between Lizzie’s and Amanda’s point of view and I enjoyed reading both. The other characters were also interesting to read about as well. I did have some trouble figuring out why some of them were married to their partners in the first place, though.

It’s difficult to talk much about specifics of the plot of this book without spoiling things; such is the nature of thrillers! I do think the only thing apart from the relationships that brought my rating down was that there were certain plot points that didn’t feel developed enough for me. At least one big reveal seemed to be sprung on the reader only to not really be discussed again and I wasn’t really sure what to do with that information after the initial shock. At 400 pages, I know it’s already a longer book but I just needed a little more to make that reveal feel connected to the overall story.

Even though I had some issues with parts of the book, I can’t deny the fact that I flew through it and had a good time trying to figure out how this story would end. I definitely recommend if you want a thriller that will keep you hooked!

Book Review: Lock Every Door – Riley Sager

Reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

“Because here’s the thing about being poor—most people don’t understand it unless they’ve been there themselves. They don’t know what a fragile balancing act it is to stay afloat and that if, God forbid, you momentarily slip underwater, how hard it is to resurface.”

Lock Every Door is about a young woman named Jules, who is asked to apartment sit at Manhattan’s most luxurious and mysterious apartment buildings – The Bartholomew. She’s offered an incredibly tempting sum of money to just to follow a few simple rules – don’t talk to the residents, spend every night in the apartment, and no guests. When another apartment sitter goes missing, Jules must solve the mystery of the Bartholomew.

I went into this book a little nervous. I’ve read Sager’s Final Girls and enjoyed it, but I knew people were divided on Lock Every Door’s ending. It didn’t take me long to become intrigued by the characters and the Bartholomew. Jules’ habits that surfaced and were attributed to her growing up and not having much money really felt realistic and resonated with me. Additionally, Sager creates an atmosphere where things feel almost normal. Still, there’s definitely a buzzing of danger that remains in your ear the entire time you’re reading. There’s a dumbwaiter in Jules’ apartment that made me uneasy from the beginning.

There were a couple of things that kept this from being a five-star read for me. I think the relationship between Jules and Ingrid could have had a little more time to develop. I would have liked to see them interact another time or two before the major drama takes off. I also think there were some major red flags about the job given very early on. The fact that Jules didn’t even think twice about some of the interview questions either right away or as things started to unfold was a little strange to me.

As far as the ending goes, I thought it was brilliant. I really want to talk about my thoughts, but of course, I can’t do that without spoiling anything, so from here on, a spoiler alert is in place.

Spoilers ahead!

When Jules was doing research at the library and thought everything going on in the Bartholomew was related to a cult, I was incredibly turned off. I like reading about cults, but I don’t think there was enough in the previous chapters to set that up adequately. Thankfully the truth was revealed shortly after (did we really need the cult suggestion in the first place?). I mentioned Jules’ habits before, but I remember thinking early on when she was talking about buying groceries and her relationship with money that I was so glad Sager went there. It was really relatable, and sometimes people write characters that come from poor backgrounds, and it feels so out of touch. I read part of that early passage to my partner because I was glad to see a character that thought like me.

I thought that would be the end of the class commentary, but oh boy, was I wrong. Everyone in the Bartholomew felt so self-important and entitled that they just preyed on working-class people and harvested their organs. A thriller that tackles the rich exploiting the working class to maintain their livelihoods? Sign me up. I was reminded of Carnegie’s “The Gospel of Wealth” in that both texts have an underlying “money makes me better than you” tone. 
Overall, Lock Every Door provided the social commentary I desire and am thinking about so much during this pandemic (and always, if I’m being honest). Not to mention, it played on one of my previous huge fears – getting my organs harvested. 😅

Review: The Guest List by Lucy Foley

Reviews

Hey guys! Welcome to my first official review!

Rating: 5 out of 5.

I’ve been talking about this book over on my Instagram and with anyone else who has read it (or is thinking about reading it) and it’s Lucy Foley’s The Guest List. This is the first book I read this month and I had such a great time with it. I got so caught up in the mystery and wanting to know what would ultimately happen. Let’s just say, I was not prepared nor did I expect what happens. 

To start, this book takes place on an island off the coast of Ireland. It’s not exactly a fun island getaway type of place – more like bogs and rain and creepy vibes all around. Jules and Will are set to have this incredibly fancy, perfect wedding but the weather is not cooperating and neither are the guests. Whether they might have lingering feelings for someone they’re not married to, boarding school secrets, or have too much on their plate to care about something as frivolous as a wedding, things aren’t running smoothly. As secrets and lies are revealed, someone turns up dead by the end of the night but who is it? And who did it? And why?

I love books that are told from multiple points of view. I think it is a great way for an author to reveal a lot of information and it makes the story go much quicker. I didn’t want to put it down! Another aspect of this book that adds to the intrigue is the way Foley plants little hints in every short chapter. You will know a little more every few pages. Sometimes mysteries or thrillers have a tendency to drag through the middle and you’ll go ages without learning much but The Guest List continues to drop crumbs until it needs to give us whole loaves of bread – and exciting loaves they were!

Foley is also great at giving the reader strong characters. Every single character added value to the story and that can sometimes be difficult when working with such a large ensemble. I have seen some reviews of people not enjoying this book because so many of the characters are unlikable. I agree. Will and his school friends are particularly gross but I think this works in Foley’s favor. You aren’t sure who to suspect and there are weird vibes all around because so many of the characters are unlikable. There are so many people you could imagine having a hand in the murder. In fact, thinking about possible scenarios is almost half the fun! You don’t even know who’s been killed until the end. Overall, this book is such a wild time.

I’ve just recently been getting back into the mystery/thriller genre (and reading for fun in general if I’m being honest) and this was a fantastic start to my mission to make time for a hobby I love. I am excited to be back ❤

CW: self-harm, mention of suicide